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2010 CGOA Runway: Tunisian Weightless Wrap

Vashti Braha modeling the Tunisian Weightless Wrap, CGOA fashion show 2010 in Manchester NH
At least one of these photos was taken by Doris Chan at the Chain Link Conference fashion show, 2010, Manchester New Hampshire. View full size.

Found these photos I’d forgotten about! They was taken at a crochet conference in 2010. I’m modeling the Tunisian Weightless Wrap because it won an award in the CGOA Design Contest.

CGOA Design Contest, 2010

Read my short article on the very first year of the contest (2008). It has since become an exciting annual event, thanks to Doris Chan’s tireless efforts in the early 3-4 years of it.

The Weightless Wrap is the inspiration for one of my longest running crochet classes on Tunisian eyelet meshes. I’ve just completed the 2016 class resource page for it–that’s how I found these photos again.

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Day 4: Completing Special CGOA Forms

Blog it to Do it? It’s Working!

I’m already seeing that blogging these 50 steps in 50 days helps me do them sooner. Here’s one: filling out special event forms. A few months before every CGOA conference, decisions must be made about fun opportunities. There’s probably a form for it.

DONE: Forms for Teachers and for General Attendees.

All CGOA members are encouraged to enter something in the design competition and in the fashion show. The fashion show takes place during the big gala banquet at the end of the conference. There’s a simple form for that. (Of course attendees also need to fill out the registration form for classes and special events. Reserve this year’s commemorative pin! It’s only $5.)

CGOA teachers filled out most teaching forms back in the fall when they submitted class topic proposals. Other than that, teachers need to:

  • Make sure they’ve registered for the fashion show banquet.
  • Look for the email with the deadline for shipping class materials to what address.

I’m up to date here.

HALF DONE: CGOA Forms for Exhibitors.

I found out last year when I had my first show booth that exhibitors receive two packets of forms and information (in PDF format). The first packet comes from the CGOA staff and the other one comes from the hotel/convention center management. Each usually has handy check off lists.

(Pictured: In this 2015 photo I’m wearing the exhibitor badge that I filled out a form for again this year.)

Last year I read all of the fine print. ALL of it. This year I only need to skim it. I don’t feel overwhelmed with all the information, choices, and deadlines this time. I still have decisions but not the detail overload. It’s easier to prioritize.

I’ve received the first of these two packets so far. The Exhibitor Badge Order Form is the most important one in it. DONE well before the June 15 deadline! And so happy to be able to list Doris Chan and my husband as two of my seven fabulous helpers to receive badges.

Printed out the Grand Prize Donation Form so that I can mull it over. That’s it! If I don’t get to the rest of the first packet (advertising options, etc.) it’s ok.

-:——-:-

CGOA Show opening 2015 San Diego
In this 2015 photo I’m wearing the exhibitor badge that I filled out a form for again this year.

[If you need more information about attending, teaching, or exhibiting at this event, email info@knitcrochetconference.com or call 740.452.4541 .]

-:——-:-

 

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On The CGOA Runway: Doris Chan’s Lotus Bolero and Lace Pants

Vashti Braha models Doris Chan’s crochet designs in Lotus yarn.

CGOA member Irene Iannelli brings her photography-savvy husband, Alex, to Chain Link conferences. Here’s one Alex snapped at the 2014 summer fashion show banquet, during the guild’s 20th anniversary crochet conference.

Doris Chan designed the lace pants and the bolero in her signature construction method of crocheting in the round from the top down. The drape and fit feel naturally comfortable and sleek. She waited to design these garments until we developed the Lotus yarn for them. They’re made for each other.

Click on the photo for more details on the patterns. Bolero pattern and our Lotus yarn are in the shop.

Even Alex and Irene’s adorable toddling daughter modeled on the runway for the first time! July 26, 2014 at the Radisson in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Closeout Lotus

Lotus yarn colors closeup

The first yarn with “Z-Twisted” right on the label is being retired after an 8-year run. Everything else Designing Vashti—the crochet hooks, the Jelly Yarn®, Vashti’s crochet patterns, Doris Chan’s DJC patterns, the newsletters, class resources, etc.—it’s all still here! (In fact, the overall crochet focus of the site is going in an educational and research direction.)

How to place your order

  1. Click this link, which will open in a new window: https://www.designingvashti.com/product-category/yarns-kits/designingvashti-lotus-yarn/. Jot down for yourself the colors and amounts available that you want to buy.
  2. Back on this page, choose “Add to cart”. Look for the green strip and choose “View cart”. It should show a $10 subtotal.
  3. While in your cart, choose “Proceed to Checkout”. If you’re a returning customer, choose “Click here to log in”. Otherwise fill in all of the necessary billing and shipping information on this page. IMPORTANT: Don’t leave the page yet!
  4. Fill out the Order Notes field under “Additional Information” with the colors and amounts of Lotus yarn you want. Talk to me! (You can also email me.) Then complete your purchase. I WILL EMAIL YOU with a confirmation of the colors and amounts, and the shipping amount that I’ll need from you to ship it.

Terms

  • Simultaneous orders may come in for the same color; I’ll reserve and process them in the order received.
  • I’m having a full house of guests during the Thanksgiving week. This could delay my response time.
  • Not all colors are available, only the remaining stock on hand.
  • All sales are final.
  • You will receive a shipment tracking number. Neither Vashti nor Designingvashti.com is responsible for a shipment lost or delayed en route to its destination.
  • I reserve the right to decline a shipment to a non-USA address.

❤️   DesigningVashti.com isn’t going anywhere! Just the Lotus yarn. ❤️

Doris and Vashti thank you for the rewarding yarn part of the crochet journey! The support of CGOA members has really made it fun!

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How to Emboss Tunisian Return Stitches (Free Pattern)

Six swatches of embossed Tunisian color work method: stars with longer spokes and in a range of yarn thicknesses and fibers; also examples of embossed horizontal bars left ungrouped into stars.

Today I’ll show you how to “emboss” Tunisian return pass crochet stitches step by step. The complete pattern for the blanket square is also included below. The background stitches are Tunisian extended simple stitches (TES). The starry groups are extended Tunisian Yarn Overs (TYO) in contrasting colors.

My 12-inch square for Knitter Knotter’s 2021 Tunisian Blanket Crochet-Along (CAL) features this novel color work method for Tunisian Crochet. The finished 12″ square is the one on the far left in the image above.

About the 2021 Tunisian Square CAL

I love how the CAL is going! Host Arunima Goel has created a fun way for designers to contribute a square, and for crocheters to experience new Tunisian stitches. My square is #18. By the end of 2021 there’ll be 24 fresh and free intermediate-level 12″ square patterns.

Plush, chunky scarf texture from basic Tunisian Crochet stitch and a high-end yarn.

Are you a Tunisian Crochet beginner? Or just need a quick review?

This Colorwork Method

I seem to have stumbled upon a way to get a fully raised texture horizontally, and in a contrasting color. And, no lacy holes!

I wanted to test the usefulness of extending Tunisian Yarn Over (TYO) groups. Sometimes a group of several TYO can get loose and loopy, just like the yarn overs of really tall stitches tend to do in regular crochet. Extending tall stitches by adding a chain here and there while making them helps use up that slack. (For some alternatives to extending, see How to Fix Loose Loops of Tall Stitches.)

Embossing return stitches has potential.

  • As a return-pass-based color work method it can be combined with existing Tunisian Mosaic, and especially Overlay methods. These are forward-pass-based methods that do fancy things vertically, with tall stitches. The possibilities boggle!
  • Make other embossed shapes. Once you learn how to emboss Tunisian return stitches, you can make other shapes besides the starry groups you see here. Arrange horizontal bars in patterns. Make some longer or shorter. Modify the stars to have spokes in different lengths or amounts.
  • As a fabric, it’s self-reinforcing yet lean and flexible. This is mainly thanks to the Tunisian Extended Simple Stitch (TES). If you’ve followed my newsletters and Tunisian classes over the years, you know I’m a big fan of extending Tunisian stitches. Normally TES fabric would be too thin or lacy for a blanket square. This is where the embossed rows come in.

How to Emboss Tunisian the Easy Way

For your first try, pick two colors and alternate them for each row: a main color (MC) for the background, and a contrast color (CC) for the raised embossed stitches. The colors will help you see where to put each next stitch.

Follow the practice swatch; it’s just twelve rows of ten stitches each. The instructions also explain the why’s, and pattern abbreviations as they come up.

Continue reading How to Emboss Tunisian Return Stitches (Free Pattern)