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Tunisian Crochet Lace Class Resources

This clickable list of Tunisian crochet lace resources is mainly to aid students of my classes in exploring more about Tunisian lace crochet at their leisure.  The links below represent the extra information that doesn’t fit into a standard three-hour class. Some are the names of designers, books, other types of crochet lace, etc., that I may have mentioned in a class.

Click: My published Tunisian Crochet downloadable patterns

— Vashti Braha

Tunisian Lace Crochet Class Resources

Click on a photo to enlarge it.

Blogged:

Vashti’s Crochet Inspirations Newsletter Topics:

Some of my not-yet published Tunisian Crochet projects

Story of the Tunisian Wicker Stitch (an eyelet mesh) featured in the Weightless Wrap:

Some Valuable Books

  • 1997: Basics of Tunisian Crochet for Beginners, N. Seto, Japan. ISBN 978-4-529-029285
  • 2000 (1991), Rebecca Jones: Tricot Crochet The Complete Book, Lacis Pubs., Berkeley CA. ISBN 978-1-891656-28-6
  • 2004, Angela “ARNie” Grabowski: Encyclopedia of Tunisian Crochet, LoneStar Abilene Pubg LLC, TX. ISBN 978-0-974972-55-8
  • 2004, Carolyn Christmas and Dorris Brooks: 101 Easy Tunisian StitchesTM, Annies Attic, IN. ISBN 978-1-931171-74-8
  • 2008: Tunisian Crochet Patterns 100, Nihon Amimono Bunka Kyo-kai, Japan ISBN 978-4-529-04484-4
  • 2009, Kim Guzman: Learn to Do Tunisian Lace Stitches, Annie’s Attic, IN. ISBN 978-1-59635-264-3
  • 2009, Sharon Hernes Silverman: Tunisian Crochet: The Look of Knitting with the Ease of Crocheting, Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg PA. ISBN 978-0-811704-84-7
  • 2014, Kim Guzman: Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide.
  • Duplet magazine issue #61.
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2014 Summer Crochet Classes, Vashti-Style!

I’m teaching six of my favorite crochet topics at the end of this July, in Manchester, New Hampshire. The occasion is the Crochet Guild of America’s annual national conference AND its 20th anniversary

Each of the classes listed below is three hours long, with a break halfway through. That break is a good thing because these classes are more in depth and thorough – even for advanced crocheters – than the usual classes available locally. For class descriptions and images, click the CGOA link above, or go to the Knit and Crochet Show site here.

The first two classes I’ll be teaching focus on two types of Tunisian crochet lace, diagonal meshes and classic filet nets. Both of them are scheduled on Thursday, July 24th:

  • T100C ~ Tunisian Eyelet Meshes: How to Turn Tss Into Lace (9 am – noon)
  • T200C ~ Tunisian Filet Lace: Skill Building Basics (2 pm – 5 pm)

The third and fourth two classes I’ll be teaching each focus on a special stitch type and all that you can do with it: Star Stitches, and Lover’s Knots. Both of them are scheduled on Friday, July 25th:

  • F100C ~ A Star Stitch for Every Purpose  (9 am – noon)
  • F200C ~ 21st Century Love Knot Adventures (2 pm – 5 pm)

My fifth and sixth classes are both about Slip Stitch Crochet: and intro class and then a shaping/special effects class. Both of them are scheduled on Saturday, July 26th:

   S101C ~ Introduction to Slip Stitch Crochet Technique (9 am – noon)

   S200C ~ Slip Stitch Shapes & Shaping Effects (2 pm – 5 pm)

I’ve also done newsletter issues on all of these topics. You can see the most recent ones listed in the Vashti’s Crochet Inspirations Newsletter archive.

 

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The Frostyflakes Crochet-Along Gallery of Winter Cheer!

Almost all of these projects were crocheted with fingering weight yarns; several of them were Madeline Tosh yarn. Hover over or click an image for the Raveler’s name and more information.

What’s a “Frosty Flake”? Why, Frostyflakes is a way to crochet groups of harmless-ol’ double crochets in a gently increasing manner to a triangular point; then, gently decrease the frosty flakes to create the other end of a shallow triangular wrap. It’s addictive and it’s flexible–as P2P (Point-to-Point construction) usually is—because you can use any kind of yarn, any amount of yarn, and end up with something that looks fabulous.

The Frostyflakes Crochet Along has been a warm cheerful spot during this year’s extended winter-into-spring season. (It’s been cold and dim in Florida too.) The great thing about hosting a CAL in a Ravelry forum is that anyone can start the same project at any time and refer to the discussion thread as if were taking place today. Discussion threads about projects contain a wealth of information and inspiration. Please visit and join Vashti’s Crochet Lounge to see all the lovely projects and meet new friends!

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Why We’re Excited About Our New Lotus Yarn

Two crochet designers — Doris Chan and Vashti Braha — asked each other,
“What if we could create just one yarn. What would it be?” Lotus is the answer.

Lotus has an inner glow that makes captivating crochet stitches as they come off of the hook. Then, watch what happens when you spritz with water later: simple blocking brings out a full drape, and plumps up the stitches just enough to make them pearly cute!

Why we love it:

– It’s spun in a final “Z-Twist” (counterclockwise) direction for superior compatibility with crochet! For most crocheters this reduces “splitting” (that’s when the crochet hook splits the plies – catches on only some of its strands during crocheting). Crocheting with a z-twisted yarn speeds up crocheting, looks prettier, and the yarn stays new-looking longer. The average plied yarn available in the US today is spun with a final “S-Twist” instead (clockwise direction).

– Almost NO Mill Knots! It’s proudly made in an American mill that also serves the fashion industry.

– The starting yarn end at the center of each ball is HOOK READY: It’s waiting for you because we’ve attached it to the yarn label. No more fishing around for it and ending up with “yarn barf.”

– It blends 52% Cotton with 48% Rayon in a special way. The rayon (a.k.a. viscose, which is derived from plant fibers) contributes a fine-grained shimmer, and the cotton keeps it from feeling too limp and slippery. Then, watch what happens when you spritz with water later: simple blocking brings out the rayon’s silky drape, while the cotton fibers plump and soften a bit to create cute, snug, pearly stitches!

The fiber blending and plying characteristics of Lotus interact so beautifully with crochet stitches.

– It’s a double-size ball. (And 1-pound cones are coming soon!) Each 3.5 oz/100g ball has 256 yds/235 m.

– Lotus is a versatile “sport weight” thickness (equivalent to #2 Fine Weight; “Light DK” or “5-Ply” in the UK). It can be used for many of your favorite patterns; see below.

– It’s available in fourteen colors! Best of all, we never have to worry about someone discontinuing this yarn. In fact, more colors are planned.

– Machine wash and dry Lotus on a gentle setting with like colors, although as with most fashion fabrics, hand washing and air drying will extend its life.

Patterns to Use With Lotus Yarn

We’re designing up a storm with Lotus! To find out about new patterns, subscribe to Crochet Inspirations newsletter.

How to Substitute Lotus Yarn: Start with the crochet hook size called for in the pattern. If it falls in a range of US-5 (F/3.75 mm) to US-7 (G/4.50 mm), then look next at the type of yarn. If it’s primarily cotton or rayon (a.k.a. viscose, bamboo, tencel) and looks smooth, chances are great that Lotus will give you the results you’re looking for.

This yarn can also work well for some fashion patterns calling for a “DK” or “Light Worsted Weight” (CYC #3 Light) yarn. Doris successfully crocheted her Jolimar Skirt with Lotus and a US-8 (H) hook. It was originally designed with Naturallycaron Spa (a discontinued yarn) and a US-9 (I/6 mm) hook. Even larger crochet hook sizes often work better for Tunisian and slip stitch crochet lace.

Especially with jewelry, bags, belts, and kitchen projects, Lotus Yarn also works great in a tighter gauge, for example, Vashti successfully substituted Lotus colors for her Aran Rozsanas Wristcuff pattern. We recommend crochet hook sizes as small as US-4 (E/3.5 mm) for jewelry, bags, and sturdy home decor, and from US-5 (F/3.75 mm) to as large as US-8 (H/5 mm) for fashion projects, depending on the amount of structure and drape needed, and the specific crochet technique used.

We carefully tailored Lotus Yarn to crochet for exciting crochet results, but of course you will love knitting and weaving with it too!