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Picot Crochet Card Edge (Free Pattern)

The other day I posted a photo of a freeform crochet card edge I did over four years ago. I found the photo by accident while looking for something else. In that post I described how to crochet it, to the best of my memory. Back then I mailed off the card right away. I have no memory of having written down any how-to info.

Well, I just now I found the notes to myself about it. By accident again! (I’ve been going through lots of old files, boxes, CD roms, etc. so I’m finding all kinds of things.)

Below I’ve typed in everything from that paper to be readable. I suppose you could say this is a…

Free Pattern for a Picot Crochet Card Edge

 

Supplies Needed:

  • Size #7 Boye steel crochet hook (or size that will pull the thread you’re using through the holes punched in the card).
  • Size #10 cotton crochet thread: Coats Opera (100% mercerized cotton, 230m per 50g ball), 2 colors.
  • Greeting card: the thicker the card stock, the better. Glossy card stock is even stronger.
  • Single hole paper punch: 1/16″ diameter holes. (Look for one in the scrapbooking section of a craft store.)

Stitches and Abbreviations Used:

  • ch = chain
  • sc = single crochet
  • sl st = slip stitch
  • st(s) = stitch(es)

Begin Picot Petals Crochet Card Edge (“Crochet Embellishment of Gloria’s sympathy Card, February 24, 2010”)

Step One: I punched holes fairly randomly. Sometimes I filled in with additional holes later.

Step Two: With pink thread for flower petals, *ch 6 or 7, sl st in the 6th or 7th ch from your crochet hook, sc in the same or next hole, depending. (Depending on how it looks and how far away the next hole is. Bunching them here and there brings out the petal look.) Repeat from the *, or just sc again in a hole; add a ch or two to adjust the tension of the sts as you edge the card.

Step Three: With green thread for leaves, ch 6 or 7, sl st in 4th or 5th ch from your hook. Space these out a bit more than the petals were. I spaced them with only just enough chs to sc in the next hole gracefully.


I ended the pattern notes with, “I like how the bunched pink petals look next to the more spread out green sts.”

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Greeting Card Crochet with Picot Petals

Greeting Card Crochet with Picot Petals

Isn’t this greeting card crochet experiment lovely?

I made it about four years ago. The recipient was touched by it. I’m glad I took a photo before I gave it away—I smile whenever I see it.

 

My goal was to try crocheting a fine irregular edge in a freeform way. (I had already crocheted chunky, evenly-spaced borders into other things, such as with the Venus Flytrap Action Toy, and the Cheerful Chores.) tablecloth

The first step was to punch tiny holes randomly spaced along a portion of the card’s irregular edges. Instead of poking holes with a needle, I found a 1/16″ single hole paper punch at my local craft store. I’m glad I did. The holes are clean-edged and look like the card came with them.

Inside of Greeting Card Crochet with Picot Petals

 

Randomly spaced holes can vary in distance from each other, and from the edge of the card. When you’re crocheting into these holes, you just have to chain more to get to a hole that’s farther away, and chain fewer to get to a closer hole.

In standard pattern language, this is eyeballing (i.e. freeform), because it’s adjustable instead of being a fixed pattern. This automatically puts it in the Intermediate Skill Level category.

Sometimes I slip stitched (sl st) into a new hole, then chained one (ch 1) so that I could sl st again into the same hole.

The picot petals are just long picots. I added extra chains before the sl st or single crochet that closes the picot.

Greeting card crochet is a useful Intermediate Level skill to know for other kinds of crochet too.

I have a Pinterest board with lots of examples: http://www.pinterest.com/vashtibraha/crochet-mixed-media/

I’ve listed a few other links below to other crocheters’ blog posts about greeting card crochet edgings. Each blogger describes a similar step of adjusting the number of chains to accommodate the space between the holes.

http://onesheepishgirl.com/2012/01/adding-a-crochet-edge-to-paper-valentines-frames.html

http://vimeo.com/11981377

http://thimbleanna.com/projects/valentinecard.html

http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf95779670.tip.html

http://dutchsister-s.blogspot.com/2011/11/tutorial-recycled-christmas-card-with.html